Transit of Mercury (11 November 2019)

Always view the Sun safely!
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Christopher K.
Posts: 4772
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Transit of Mercury (11 November 2019)

Post by Christopher K. » December 14th, 2018, 4:45 pm

Here is the outline for Baton Rouge (specifically HRPO grounds)...
6am = Highland Road Park Observatory will be open to the public. Viewing begins indirectly with streaming video from another location on Earth.
6:26am = The Sun rises.
~6:36am = The disk of Mercury makes contact with the Sun.
~6:39am = The disk of Mercury is completely "immersed" in, or "on top" of, the Sun.
6:56am = The Sun is at 5 degrees.
7:22am = The Sun is at 10 degrees.
7:48am = The Sun is at 15 degrees.
8:16am = The Sun is at 20 degrees.
8:46am = The Sun is at 25 degrees.
9:18am = The Sun is at 30 degrees.
9:56am = The Sun is at 35 degrees.
10:48am = The Sun is at 40 degrees.
11:48am = The Sun culminates at 42 degrees.
~12:02pm = The disk of Mercury begins to "leave" the Sun.
~12:05pm = Mercury and the Sun are separated.
12:33pm = The Sun is at 40 degrees.
1:00pm = HRPO closes to the public.
There will be no admission fee for this event. Solar viewers will be on sale for two dollars each; however, one will not be able to see the disk of Mercury with a solar viewer.

Christopher K.
Posts: 4772
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Transit of Mercury (11 November 2019)

Post by Christopher K. » October 4th, 2019, 2:07 pm

As with any solar viewing, appropriate precautions must be taken to insure eye damage will not result. One has a number of options for safely viewing the transit...
1) Use a solar telescope.
2) Use a nighttime telescope with a solar filter.
3) Use a commercial device, such as a Sunspotter, that projects an image of the Sun. (Some of these devices, depending on how they are constructed, may be able to project only down to a certain altitude.)
4) Use "eclipse" or solar glasses. (Check to make sure the film is in healthy condition, with no punctures or tears.) This will not provide a view of the Transit. Mercury is too small to see at 1x.
5) Homemake a projection device. (Please follow the instructions carefully.) This will not provide a view of the Transit. Mercury is too small to see at 1x.

If you have never taken part in any of these activities before, please insure that you doing it correctly and safely. If you are not absolutely convinced of that, by all means go to where pre-trained individuals are viewing the Transit.

Do not use sunglasses, do not attempt to use your hand to cover a portion of the Sun, and do not attempt to "glance quickly" in the direction of the Sun. At any rate, Mercury cannot be seen at 1x; magnification is required.

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