2020 Lyrid Meteor Shower

Seen any good fireballs lately?
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Christopher K.
Posts: 5522
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

2020 Lyrid Meteor Shower

Post by Christopher K. »

According to the American Meteor Society, the Lyrid Meteor Shower will be active from the morning of Thursday 16 April to the morning of Thursday 30 April. Keep in mind, "the morning" means before sunrise while it is still completely dark. Since silly and useless Daylight Time is in effect, this mean each of these morning the best chance of catching meteor streaks will be from 3:15am to 4:45am.

Binoculars are not needed. A meteor hunter should only use eyes, in order to see as much of the sky as possible at one time.

More information:
https://www.amsmeteors.org/meteor-showe ... ar/#Lyrids
Last edited by Christopher K. on April 27th, 2020, 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5522
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Lyrid Meteor Shower

Post by Christopher K. »

Considering tonight's forecast, the best chance to catch Lyrid streaks (or sporadic meteors) will be between 11:30pm and 1am CDT.

One should lie comfortably on the ground on a blanket or tarp that can get dirty. Alternatively, use a lawn chair or some other reclining chair. Most of the time, one should keep the head angled to a point about halfway to two-thirds from horizon to zenith (the very top of the sky).

General tips for viewing meteors include...
*Dress warmly. You'd be surprised how much body heat you lose while immobile (even in spring).
*Do not consume alcohol of any sort. Even before consumption has given you a "buzz", it has hindered night vision.
*Do not allow your electronic device (flip phone, smart phone, tablet etc.) to glow in your eyes unless you can have it glow red and faint. There are internal settings for an iPhone, and an app for an Android. Otherwise, just don't use the device.
*Do not take your eyes off the sky! Even the slowest meteors are quite fast. Talk with others if desired, but the understanding should be that searching for meteors is taking precedent.

Extinguish any personal outer lights and request that nearby neighbors do the same. If you have a civic or homeowners' association, consider making a motion to adopt a policy to switch to and maintain full cut-off (FCO) lighting year-round; this will make your neighborhood perpetually "ready" for viewing meteors in the night sky. (That permanent setup will also help views of comets, star clusters, nebulae and even the Milky Way Galaxy!)
Last edited by Christopher K. on April 21st, 2020, 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5522
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Lyrid Meteor Shower

Post by Christopher K. »

Due to incoming rainy and cloudy weather, this nighttime period will be the last chance for locals to see any Lyrids. The current NOAA forecast shows the best time to look will be 2:30am to 4am CDT Wednesday morning. Here is the NOAA forecast for that time...
precipitation potential, 0%
sky cover, 51%
relative humidity, 87%
temperature, 19˚C
surface wind, E 3 km/h

Danko's Clear Dark Sky states that during HRPO's viewing time both the transparency rating and the seeing rating will be "average" (3 out of 5). This is a forecast for good skygazing conditions.

More information:
https://www.amsmeteors.org/2020/04/view ... s-in-2020/
https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/asteroids- ... /in-depth/

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