Caldwell 1

Globulars or Open, clusters of stars can be neat viewing.
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Christopher K.
Posts: 4763
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Caldwell 1

Post by Christopher K. » November 7th, 2013, 1:36 pm

Caldwell 1 is a open cluster (one of our Milky Way's oldest) in the constellation Cepheus. Its ten brightest stars are yellow giants of spectral types G8 to K4 and apparent magnitudes of about twelve to fourteen. The cluster lies a little over four degrees SSW of Polaris. John Herschel discovered it in 1831. Caldwell 1 is also known as NGC 188, Collinder 6 and Melotte 2.

These are the times during which Caldwell 1 reaches its culmination of thirty-five degrees in the Baton Rouge sky. Its magnitude is 8.1.
8 August = 4:45am
12 August = 4:29am
16 August = 4:14am
20 August = 3:58am
24 August = 3:42am
28 August = 3:26am
1 September = 3:11am
5 September = 2:55am
9 September = 2:39am
13 September = 2:24am
17 September = 2:08am
21 September = 1:52am
25 September = 1:36am
29 September = 1:21am
3 October = 1:05am
7 October = 12:49am
11 October = 12:33am
15 October = 12:18am
19 October = 11:58pm
23 October = 11:42pm
27 October = 11:27pm
31 October = 11:11pm
Times above are Daylight. Times below are Standard.
4 November = 9:55pm
8 November = 9:39pm
12 November = 9:24pm
16 November = 9:08pm
20 November = 8:52pm
24 November = 8:37pm
28 November = 8:21pm
2 December = 8:05pm
6 December = 7:49pm
10 December = 7:34pm
14 December = 7:18pm
18 December = 7:02pm

The late Patrick Moore developed the Caldwell Catalog, sorting it by declination; it was first published (I believe) in the December 1995 Sky & Telescope.

More information:
Burnham's Celestial Handbook, pp. 613-615.
http://messier.seds.org/xtra/ngc/n0188.html

Images:
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/images/cep/ngc188.jpg
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130629.html
http://archive.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/mastpr ... =IBCY05B7Q

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