M9

Globulars or Open, clusters of stars can be neat viewing.
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Christopher K.
Posts: 4772
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

M9

Post by Christopher K. » January 21st, 2014, 10:32 pm

M9, also catalogued as NGC 6333, is a small globular cluster 3˚31' southeast of magnitude 2.4, A-class Sabik in Ophiuchus. Messier discovered it in May 1764.

So how easy is it to see M9? I've never tried, but I know it would fit very loosely in a 30' field of view. O'Meara says "at low power it has a very strongly condensed center and a tiny unresolved halo...".

A NASA/ESA picture of M9 is the May image in Astronomy Magazine's 2014 Deep Space Mysteries calendar.

Below are the times during which M9 reaches its highest Baton Rouge altitude of forty-one degrees...
All times are Daylight.
6 April = 5:25am
10 April = 5:09am
14 April = 4:53am
18 April = 4:38am
22 April = 4:22am
26 April = 4:06am
30 April = 3:50am
4 May = 3:35am
8 May = 3:19am
12 May = 3:03am
16 May = 2:48am
20 May = 2:32am
24 May = 2:16am
28 May = 2:00am
1 June = 1:45am
5 June = 1:29am
9 June = 1:13am
13 June = 12:58am
17 June = 12:42am
21 June = 12:26am
25 June = 12:10am
29 June = 11:51pm
3 July = 11:35pm
7 July = 11:19pm
11 July = 11:03pm
15 July = 10:48pm
19 July = 10:32pm
23 July = 10:16pm
27 July = 10:01pm
31 July = 9:45pm
4 August = 9:29pm

More information:
Burnham's Celestial Handbook, pp. 1258-1261.
The Messier Objects by Stephen James O'Meara, pp. 61-62.
http://messier.seds.org/m/m009.html

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