47 Tucanae

Globulars or Open, clusters of stars can be neat viewing.
Post Reply
Christopher K.
Posts: 4772
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

47 Tucanae

Post by Christopher K. » February 14th, 2011, 6:35 pm

The astrophotographer is Dieter Willasch, of whom I've never heard. This picture impresses me, though, and it makes me wonder when (if ever) I will be creating such images.

47 Tucanae (the second-brightest globular cluster after Omega Centauri) lies about 13,000 light years away, two-and-a-half degrees west of the Small Magellanic Cloud. It was first classified the 47th star in the constellation Tucana the Toucan. In Burnham's Tucana short list, NGC 104 garners a impressive three exclamation points. Good telescopes of with a ten-centimeter aperture will pick up the bright core of NGC 104.

In May 2001 the Chandra X-Ray telescope detected several binaries in 47 Tucanae; it also found evidence of "millisecond pulsars" which rotate at least 100 times per second.

The picture:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110116.html

Tucanae 47 information:
http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/ngc/n0104.html
Burnham's Celestial Handbook, pp. 1909-1913.

Christopher K.
Posts: 4772
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: 47 Tucanae

Post by Christopher K. » December 12th, 2016, 2:40 pm

Clusters are mainly divided into two categories--open and globular. Even within that basic separation, though, are clusters so distinct an enthusiast can identify several in images with no captions!

On Friday 13 January at 7:30pm, LSU physics undergraduate Rory Bentley will be at the Highland Road Park Observatory to discuss star clusters. The lecture has no admission fee and is aimed at a general adult audience.

Post Reply