Baton Rouge Astronomical Society Forum

It is currently September 25th, 2017, 8:57 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: June 10th, 2011, 7:20 am 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 12:29 pm
Posts: 177
Location: Sorrento, LA
In this case, they may have found huge magnetic bubbles near the edge of the Sun's influence in the galaxy.


http://news.cnet.com/8301-19514_3-20070 ... ag=nl.e703

_________________
Frederick J. Barnett
"Someone's got to take the responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: July 18th, 2011, 4:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Isn't that amazing?

The bubbles are supposed to be 60 million kilometers across. Half-century-old theories postulated the Sun's magnetic field curved back inward. Voyager 1 first got to this area in 2007 but it took a while to ascertain what the data meant. The scientists are still attempting to work out whether the bubbles allow cosmic rays into the Solar System or hinder their passage.

More information:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/heliosphere-surprise.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 11th, 2012, 10:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
A heater has been turned off inside Voyager 1 to reduce power consumption. The heater belongs to the infrared spectrometer, which has not been operational since 1998. The spacecraft is now operating at lower than minus 79ÂșC.

This power-down will apparently allow Voyager 1 to perform and transmit back to Earth useful science until 2025. Voyager 1's ultraviolet spectrometer is still functioning.

More information:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20120117.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: June 26th, 2012, 10:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
It is surely a race against time, but Voyager 1 might actually give us a boundary limit for the solar wind before its instruments all go silent. Beginning in May, the cosmic ray detections have increased dramatically in what would amount to fairly steep curve if plotted with the comparatively gradual increase over the three years prior.

More information:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-177


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 10th, 2012, 8:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Thanks to a planetary alignment that occurs every 176 years, Voyager 2 was able to visit all four gas giants. It is still, to date, the only spacecraft to visit either Uranus or Neptune. Voyager 2 made the cut as one of the top fifty greatest moments of Solar System exploration, voted on by visitors to NASA's Solar System Exploration section.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 15th, 2013, 6:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Yes! Voyager 1 has done it. I personally consider this one of the major data-gathering accomplishments in all of history. The Voyager team has determined that as of 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 crossed into interstellar space. The instrument it had to measure plasma concentration failed in 1980, so the conclusion was reached with other information. A March 2012 coronal mass ejection from the Sun arrived at Voyager 1's location in April 2013, allowing the plasma wave instrument to detect the movement. This helped scientists determine the density of the plasma. Technically, the craft has not left the outer Solar System entirely since the Oort Cloud is so vast.

Interestingly, Marc Swisdak of the University of Maryland, J.F. Drake and M. Opher suggest the crossover was closer to 25 July of last year.

Voyager's instruments will be shut down one by one due to lack of energy starting around 2020. (Voyager 2, heading away from the inner Solar System in a different direction, is 102AU from the Sun.)

NASA Announcement:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20130912.html

More stories:
http://www.astronomy.com/en/News-Observing/News/2013/09/Voyager%20probe%20has%20left%20the%20solar%20system.aspx
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/home/Onward-Voyager-to-the-Stars-223676961.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 18th, 2013, 3:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
There will be an Interstellar Space Party at HRPO on Friday, 4 October from 8:30pm to 10:30pm in honor of Voyager 1's accomplishment. There will be classic Voyager imagery on display, as well as a sampling of sounds included on the Golden Record.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 25th, 2014, 10:37 am 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
At 1pm CDT today a one-hour panel discussion on Voyager will take place at the Webb Auditorium in DC. The discussion is titled "Memories from the Team". The discussion will be moderated by David Grinspoon of the Planetary Science Institute.

The panel will include...
Fran Bagenal of the University of Colorado
Bonnie Buratti of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Jeffrey Moore of the Ames Research Center
John Spencer of the Southwest Research Institute

More information:
http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/nasa-tv-to-air-events-that-highlight-pluto-bound-spacecraft/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 4th, 2017, 6:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
From the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a live celebration of Voyager's fortieth anniversary will be broadcast at 11:30am CDT tomorrow on both NASA-TVs. The event will be rebroadcast at 3pm CDT and 9pm CDT.

More information:
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-and-iconic-museum-honor-voyager-spacecraft-40th-anniversary


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 7th, 2017, 11:29 am 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Posts: 3704
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
At 2pm CDT there will be a panel discussion at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory honoring Voyager for forty years of exploration. The discussion will be broadcast live on both NASA-TVs.

New Downloadable Commemorative Posters...
https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group